Category General


General

Ocular (Eye) Discharge in Small Mammals

Ocular or eye discharge is a principal sign of eye disease. Abnormal discharges may develop suddenly or gradually. They may be serous (watery), mucoid (thickened and ropy), purulent (yellowish green and thickened) or hemorrhagic (bloody). In general, the greater amounts of discharge occur with more serious disease.
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General

Abdominal Exploratory in Ferrets

An abdominal exploratory surgery refers to almost every non-specific surgery of the abdomen. More specific surgeries of the abdomen include spaying (ovariohysterectomy) and cystotomy, the removal of bladder stones. All other abdominal surgeries are defined as exploratory, referring to the fact that every organ in the abdomen is inspected for abnormalities and treated if necessary.
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General

Anorexia in Ferrets

Anorexia is a term used to describe the situation where a ferret does not want to eat or is physically unable to eat. There are many causes of anorexia. Often, a loss of appetite is the first indication of illness. Diseases of the digestive system - including the esophagus, stomach, intestine, liver, pancreas - the kidneys, the blood, the eyes, mouth, nose, and throat, the skin, the brain, and many other organs in the body can cause a loss of appetite.
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General

Does My Horse Need Horseshoe Studs?

If your horse's hooves are suffering from the summer footing and you are having trouble finding a place on hard, dry ground to ride, you may want to ask your farrier about using studs, which act like cleats on the bottom of golf or football shoes and help keep the horse from slipping in a variety of conditions.
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General

How to Give Medication to Your Horse

If the thought of administering medication to a recalcitrant child makes you blanch, consider the fun involved in getting a pill down the throat of a 1,000-pound horse - or worse, 10 pills, which is the normal dose of many equine antibiotics. Even if you haven't had to give your horse a round of antibiotics, chances are you've had to stuff a phenylbutazone - commonly called bute, which is the equivalent of aspirin - in his mouth at some time.
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General

Autopsy - Post Mortem Exam - Necropsy in Small Mammals

After a pet family member passes away, pet owners are sometimes left wondering why the pet died and whether anything could have been done to save him/her. A post-mortem exam is a very informative service that may be available to you through your veterinarian. Although it is minimally traumatic, often overlooked or frequently declined, this service can provide a wealth of information for you as a pet owner and for your veterinarian.
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General

Bacterial Pneumonia in the Horse

Pneumonia refers to inflammation of the lungs. In horses, this is usually due to a bacterial infection, most commonly the streptococcal species. Most horses get pneumonia by inhaling bacteria, which are often normal inhabitants of the upper airways. The lungs are usually able to clear the bacteria rapidly.
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General

Smoke Inhalation in Small Mammals

Smoke inhalation injury is direct damage to the airways and lung tissue caused by exposure to heat, particulate matter in smoke and the gaseous by-products of fire. Smoke inhalation injury can be caused by: Thermal (heat induced) injury to the upper airways Inhalation of particulate matter that settles in upper airways and the lungs Asphyxia (suffocation) since the fire reduces the oxygen content in the air that is breathed Chemical injury, due to chemicals such as carbon monoxide, cyanide, acrolein, hydrogen chloride and aldehydes that are released as gases within the fire Smoke inhalation injury can lead to bronchospasm and bronchoconstriction (spasming and constriction of the airways), carbon monoxide poisoning, pulmonary edema (accumulation of fluid in the lungs), acute respiratory distress (inability to breathe) and pneumonia.
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General

Sailfin Lizard Tip

Adult sailfin lizards, from the South Pacific, need very large cages with a large bathing pool. Up to a trio can be kept in a cage at least 8-foot by 4-foot by 6 foot. Running water is a necessity. Owning a sailfin lizard is not for beginners. They are nervous lizards that will run into their cage walls if they think there is danger.
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General

Red-Tailed Boa Tip

The true red-tailed boas, boa constrictors, are from the rainforests of tropical South America. Babies are 14 inches long when they hatch and adults can reach 8 to 11 feet long. These attractive constrictors can be tamed well by repeated gentle handling. However, two people should be present when handling a boa 8 feet or longer.
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General

Hibernation Tip

In their natural environments many box turtles and true tortoises hibernate from October or November until late February, March or even early April. The natural shortening of day length and the reduced brightness of daylight, as well as the decreased availability of food, are among the cues that induce hibernating behavior.
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General

Marbled Salamander Tip

Marbled salamanders ( Ambystoma opacum ) are found in the eastern United States. Keep their tanks cool, and make sure that any lighting does not heat the tank over 68 to 78 degrees Fahrenheit. Feed your salamanders earthworms once or twice weekly. Cage temperatures can cool to the mid-50s during the winter, but salamanders will become semi-dormant.
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General

Jeweled Lacerta Tip

The jeweled or eyed lacertas, Lacerta lepida , are from Spain, France and northern Italy. Males may spar with each other, but are essentially compatible when kept in small groups. Make sure you have a large cage for these active lizards; they are fast runners. These lacertas enjoy basking under a bright overhead light and become very active when warmed.
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Green Ameiva Tip

Green ameivas are active, heliothermic lizards that come from South America. They need bright light for normal activity. Place a basking light at one end of the cage so that he can go back and forth between the heat and shade as he wants. These alert and active lizards need the largest caging possible.
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General

Taiwan Beauty Snake Tip

The Taiwan Beauty or striped-tailed snake, Elaphe taeniurus ssp. , ranges from the Indo-Australian islands, northward to Assam and north China. Hatchling beauty snakes can be kept in a 15-gallon terrarium, but will quickly outgrow this size. It's easier to start with a 20- or 30-gallon tank that would suit an adult.
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General

Preparing Your Barn for the Winter

Depending on where you live, winter may be getting ready to throw you some difficult weather. The best time to gear up for it at the barn is before a major snow or ice storm hits. Hopefully, you've prepared your horses with the necessary shoeing for icy turnout conditions, and cleaned, repaired and stored blankets.
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General

When to Consider Euthanasia in Birds

Many pets suffer with chronic diseases or cancer. Often these diseases can be managed and controlled in such a way that life is prolonged. However, quality of life is an equally important factor to most pet owners and it is the issue that most often influences the decision to have a veterinarian perform euthanasia.
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General

Gliding Frog Tip

Gliding frogs eat small moths, slugs, worms, spiders and other insects. Unless you want to keep those around the house, offer your frogs crickets, mealworms, earthworm pieces, waxworms and non-hairy caterpillars. Set the terrarium up vertically for these climbing frogs. When kept in very large outdoor cages, these frogs are capable of long, descending leaps from elevated surfaces.
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General

When to Consider Euthanasia in Horses

Many animals suffer with chronic diseases or cancer. Often these diseases can be managed and controlled in such a way that life is prolonged. However, quality of life is an equally important factor to most horse owners and it is the issue that most often influences the decision to have a veterinarian perform euthanasia.
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General

Forging a Partnership with Your Veterinarian

You and your veterinarian are partners. Together you work toward the same goal: a healthy horse. But reaching that goal is often determined by how well you work with your veterinarian and his staff. As a horse owner, you can either make or break the partnership by what you do or don't do. "The best relationships develop when people work together," said Dr.
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